Category: online journal

End of the year reflections and thank you!

We are fast approaching the end of 2011 and another year of blogging is also gone by.

This blog started for fun, mainly to provide freely accessible information for coaches and sports scientists around the World in a simple format and possibly using multimedia. I try to keep it going also because I realised it is a good way to reach students and young practitioners as well as being a good platform for debate on many topics. This year I also joined Twitter and started to link social media with the blog in order to offer more and also be able to debate topical issues in sports and exercise sciences.

This year I also used the blog to write a letter in response to an ill-informed newspaper article and received some amazing feedback. Thank you not only for reading the letter but also for supporting my view that that piece of work was really a lot of non-sense.

The blog has grown an incredible following very fast since starting it in 2009. This means that whatever I write is of interest and hopefully stimulates more ideas in other parts of the World. This is exactly what I wanted from the blog. Develop a platform rather than a forum for discussions. The Internet is full of places to discuss and debate, I prefer this place to be somewhere to read something interesting and use it as a starting point, a stimulus to read further and find out more.

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This year the blog received 27,668 visits from 145 countries. A lot more visits and countries than last year. I can only say thank you to you all. I am humbled by such interest in what I have to say.

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I hope to have the time to keep writing something useful and interesting in 2012. I have few ideas and hope time will be on my side. Next year will be an interesting one professionally, with the Olympic Games in London. I have learnt so much in the last few years having to work towards a “home” Olympic game and will share some ideas and concepts on these pages when possible.

I wish you all a productive and exciting 2012 and thank you again for coming back to visit this blog so often.

Visualise scientific experiments

Dear readers,

I came across this interesting journal few days ago: Journal of Visualized Experiments.

Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) is a peer reviewed, free access, online journal devoted to the publication of biological research in a video format. The Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) was established as a new tool in life science publication and communication, with participation of scientists from leading research institutions. JoVE takes advantage of video technology to capture and transmit the multiple facets and intricacies of life science research. Visualization greatly facilitates the understanding and efficient reproduction of both basic and complex experimental techniques, thereby addressing two of the biggest challenges faced by today’s life science research community: i) low transparency and poor reproducibility of biological experiments and ii) time and labor-intensive nature of learning new experimental techniques.

An interesting experiment to see is the following:

In vivo Micro-circulation Measurement in Skeletal Muscle by Intra-vital Microscopy

Akihiro Asai1, Nita Sahani1, Yasuyoshi Ouchi2, Jeevendra Martyn1, Shingo Yasuhara

1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Shriners Hospital for Children, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, 2Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo

http://www.jove.com/index/Details.stp?ID=210

Visualise scientific experiments

 

Dear readers,

I came across this interesting journal few days ago: Journal of Visualized Experiments.

Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) is a peer reviewed, free access, online journal devoted to the publication of biological research in a video format. The Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) was established as a new tool in life science publication and communication, with participation of scientists from leading research institutions. JoVE takes advantage of video technology to capture and transmit the multiple facets and intricacies of life science research. Visualization greatly facilitates the understanding and efficient reproduction of both basic and complex experimental techniques, thereby addressing two of the biggest challenges faced by today’s life science research community: i) low transparency and poor reproducibility of biological experiments and ii) time and labor-intensive nature of learning new experimental techniques.

An interesting experiment to see is the following:

In vivo Micro-circulation Measurement in Skeletal Muscle by Intra-vital Microscopy

Akihiro Asai1, Nita Sahani1, Yasuyoshi Ouchi2, Jeevendra Martyn1, Shingo Yasuhara

1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Shriners Hospital for Children, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, 2Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo

http://www.jove.com/index/Details.stp?ID=210